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Cris Gianakos, Send Our Boys Home, 1970

$1,500.00
Cris Gianakos

Send Our Boys Home, 1970

Silkscreen. Hand Signed. Dated. Numbered. Unframed.
35 × 23 × 3/5 in
88.9 × 58.4 × 1.5 cm

Edition 37/225

Based on a smaller work the artist first created in 1966 (in the permanent collection of MOMA), by 1970, Gianakos' powerful anti war print "Send our Boys Home", literally and symbolically, becomes larger . Here, the artist replaces the stars a stripes simply with a black void, completely changing a patriotic emblem into a symbol of hopelessness and despair. Pencil signed, dated and numbered from the edition of 225. A classic and uncommon anti-Vietnam war piece from 1970 - that is also relevant to the present era. This work was acquired from the Estate of Reese Palley - the flamboyant impresario (known as the "merchant to the rich") - and one of the first gallerists to open shop in SOHO, Manhattan. (He would later return to his native Atlantic City, where he opened a gallery.) The only other editions of this print, including the present one, that we have seen come to market are from the Palley Estate, which donated the rest of his collection to museum collections.




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Description

Cris Gianakos

Send Our Boys Home, 1970

Silkscreen. Hand Signed. Dated. Numbered. Unframed.
35 × 23 × 3/5 in
88.9 × 58.4 × 1.5 cm

Edition 37/225

Based on a smaller work the artist first created in 1966 (in the permanent collection of MOMA), by 1970, Gianakos' powerful anti war print "Send our Boys Home", literally and symbolically, becomes larger . Here, the artist replaces the stars a stripes simply with a black void, completely changing a patriotic emblem into a symbol of hopelessness and despair. Pencil signed, dated and numbered from the edition of 225. A classic and uncommon anti-Vietnam war piece from 1970 - that is also relevant to the present era. This work was acquired from the Estate of Reese Palley - the flamboyant impresario (known as the "merchant to the rich") - and one of the first gallerists to open shop in SOHO, Manhattan. (He would later return to his native Atlantic City, where he opened a gallery.) The only other editions of this print, including the present one, that we have seen come to market are from the Palley Estate, which donated the rest of his collection to museum collections.




Additional info

Weight: 1.00 LBS
Width: 35.00
Height: 23.00
Shipping: Calculated at Checkout