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R. B. Kitaj Acheson Go Home (Unique proof inscribed to art critic and curator Gene Baro) 1964

R.B. Kitaj
$8,500.00

 R. B. Kitaj (American, 1932–2007)

Acheson Go Home,  1964
Silkscreen in 12 colors
Hand signed, dated & Inscribed
Published by Chris Prater, Kelpra Studio, London (with blind stamp)
Catalog Raisonné : Kinsman(1994), 7
Unique proof inscribed to art critic and curator Gene Baro
 

The original collage for Acheson Go Home is now in the collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. The collage combined a range of material including a torn sheet of anti-American propaganda, photographs and a fragment of a book dust jacket. The red stain in the lower part of the present work came from a drop of blood on the original collage.

This work was acquired from the estate of the prolific and influential writer and art critic Gene Baro, who included Kitaj in print biennials he guest curated at the Brooklyn Museum.  It bears the English headline "Acheson Go Home" in a silkscreened collage featuring the design of an excerpt from an Austrian newspaper editorial - with the text underneath in German.  The headline’s subject is Dean Acheson, the bombastic and highly influential US Secretary of State under Democratic President Harry Truman. Acheson spearheaded some of the greatest US foreign policy achievements in the decade after WWII including the foundation of NATO, the Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan - the American project to aid reconstruction in Europe after the Second World War and to combat the spread of communism.  (Acheson documented his achievements in his oft-cited memoir Present at the Creation.) The Austrian headline “Acheson Go Home” appeared when the Secretary of State visited Austria to discuss the Marshall Plan.

 R.B. Kitaj (Ronald Brooks Kitaj)  is an American born British educated Pop artist, who was born in Cleveland, Ohio, to a Viennese (Austrian) mother and Jewish stepfather, whose last name he adopted. Kitaj held many intellectual interests, including surrealism, art and political history, literature, and Jewish identity, which influenced his work. Many of his works were inspired by his political ideas and by reactions to stories he heard from his family about the Nazis during World War II. 

In 1959 he moved to London, where he attended the Ruskin School and the Royal College of Art and became more closely associated with British rather than American painting. Kitaj burst onto the 1960s London art scene alongside David Hockney, Richard Hamilton and Peter Blake.  From 1963 until the mid 1970s Kitaj made a number of screenprints incorporating photography and text which mixed collaged elements with drawing. This work is one of the earliest prints of that period, created in collaboration with the now famed Chris Prater at the Kelpra Studio.

 

In 1963 Kitaj had his first one-man exhibition at the Marlborough New London Gallery. In 1964 he was represented at the Venice Biennale and the Documenta "3" exhibition and in 1968 at the Documenta "4", Kassel. In 1965-66 he visited the USA and was given his first retrospective at the LA County Museum of Art, and in 1977 he settled in Hollywood, California.

Catalog Raisonné : Kinsman(1994), 7

This work is held in the vintage frame. Work in very good condition; frame has nicks, etc. 

SIGNATURE

Hand signed, dated and inscribed on the lower left recto (front). 

PROVENANCE

Acquired from the estate of renowned art critic and curator Gene Baro, who included Kitaj's work in a major Brooklyn Museum print survey. 

 

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Description

 R. B. Kitaj (American, 1932–2007)

Acheson Go Home,  1964
Silkscreen in 12 colors
Hand signed, dated & Inscribed
Published by Chris Prater, Kelpra Studio, London (with blind stamp)
Catalog Raisonné : Kinsman(1994), 7
Unique proof inscribed to art critic and curator Gene Baro
 

The original collage for Acheson Go Home is now in the collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. The collage combined a range of material including a torn sheet of anti-American propaganda, photographs and a fragment of a book dust jacket. The red stain in the lower part of the present work came from a drop of blood on the original collage.

This work was acquired from the estate of the prolific and influential writer and art critic Gene Baro, who included Kitaj in print biennials he guest curated at the Brooklyn Museum.  It bears the English headline "Acheson Go Home" in a silkscreened collage featuring the design of an excerpt from an Austrian newspaper editorial - with the text underneath in German.  The headline’s subject is Dean Acheson, the bombastic and highly influential US Secretary of State under Democratic President Harry Truman. Acheson spearheaded some of the greatest US foreign policy achievements in the decade after WWII including the foundation of NATO, the Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan - the American project to aid reconstruction in Europe after the Second World War and to combat the spread of communism.  (Acheson documented his achievements in his oft-cited memoir Present at the Creation.) The Austrian headline “Acheson Go Home” appeared when the Secretary of State visited Austria to discuss the Marshall Plan.

 R.B. Kitaj (Ronald Brooks Kitaj)  is an American born British educated Pop artist, who was born in Cleveland, Ohio, to a Viennese (Austrian) mother and Jewish stepfather, whose last name he adopted. Kitaj held many intellectual interests, including surrealism, art and political history, literature, and Jewish identity, which influenced his work. Many of his works were inspired by his political ideas and by reactions to stories he heard from his family about the Nazis during World War II. 

In 1959 he moved to London, where he attended the Ruskin School and the Royal College of Art and became more closely associated with British rather than American painting. Kitaj burst onto the 1960s London art scene alongside David Hockney, Richard Hamilton and Peter Blake.  From 1963 until the mid 1970s Kitaj made a number of screenprints incorporating photography and text which mixed collaged elements with drawing. This work is one of the earliest prints of that period, created in collaboration with the now famed Chris Prater at the Kelpra Studio.

 

In 1963 Kitaj had his first one-man exhibition at the Marlborough New London Gallery. In 1964 he was represented at the Venice Biennale and the Documenta "3" exhibition and in 1968 at the Documenta "4", Kassel. In 1965-66 he visited the USA and was given his first retrospective at the LA County Museum of Art, and in 1977 he settled in Hollywood, California.

Catalog Raisonné : Kinsman(1994), 7

This work is held in the vintage frame. Work in very good condition; frame has nicks, etc. 

SIGNATURE

Hand signed, dated and inscribed on the lower left recto (front). 

PROVENANCE

Acquired from the estate of renowned art critic and curator Gene Baro, who included Kitaj's work in a major Brooklyn Museum print survey. 

 

Additional info

Weight: 5.00 LBS
Width: 28.00
Height: 36.63
Max Purchase Qty: 1 unit
Shipping: $595.00 (Fixed Shipping Cost)